Rep. Susan Davis Push to Close Equity Gap in Career and Tech Education Passes House Committee

Jul 7, 2016
Press Release

WASHINGTON – Congresswoman Susan Davis (D-San Diego) successfully passed language to help close the equity gap that currently exists in career and technical education (CTE).  Davis’s language would require states to ensure they are working to close the gap.

“Everyone deserves education pathways and jobs that can get them to middle class,” said Davis, a senior member of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. “This language will ensure states take further steps to close existing gaps in performance and participation.”

The provision added to the bill is part of a larger bill, the Equity in Career and Technical Education Act (ECTEA), Davis introduced to promote equal access in CTE. The ECTEA strengthens the equity provisions on the Carl D. Perkins Act for women, people of color, the disabled, the economically disadvantaged, single parents, displaced homemakers, individuals pursuing nontraditional careers, English language learners. The Carl D. Perkins Act, recently reauthorized in 2006, addresses career and technical education in America.

Davis’s ECTEA is a House companion bill to similar legislation introduced by Senator Mazie Hirono (D-HI), who is leading the effort in the Senate to close the CTE equity gap.

The ECTEA will:

  • Require states to do an annual assessment of the equity gap in CTE and create plans on how to reduce the gap. This analysis can help determine where to focus resources to close performance and participation gaps.
  • Require states to provide more resources for professional development and technical assistance in order to close the gaps.
  • Provide training for CTE teachers that include best practices for closing equity gaps.

The Education and the Workforce Committee approved the bipartisan Strengthening CTE for the 21st Century Act (H.R. 5587), which included Davis’s provision. H.R. 5587 streamlines and reforms CTE programs to ensure greater access for Americans to the critical career and technical skills needed to succeed. 

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