Rep. Susan Davis Applauds Teacher Diversity Events to be Held by the Obama Administration

Feb 25, 2016
Press Release

WASHINGTON – Congresswoman Susan A. Davis (D-San Diego) praised the Obama Administration’s plan to hold two events to increase teacher diversity in America. Davis recently took the lead on sending a letter calling for a White House summit on the issue.

“I applaud the Obama Administration and the Department of Education for their strong response to the need to increase diversity in America’s teaching ranks,” said Davis, a senior member of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. “Students would benefit immensely from the experiences and knowledge that will come from greater diversity of teachers in the classroom. The events scheduled are just the kind of meeting of the minds needed to achieve this goal.”

In a letter to President Obama and acting Education Secretary John King, Davis and her colleagues wrote that bringing together educators, researchers, policy makers, and students “will be an important step in elevating the national dialogue on this pressing issue.”

Acting Secretary King responded with the announcement of two events in the spring. A panel discussion in March featuring acting Secretary King, the American Federation of Teachers, Teach for America, and Howard University will address the need for more teachers of color in the teaching profession. In May, another event will allow leaders and stakeholders to work on ways to increase diversity in the teaching profession in their areas.

Last April, Davis introduced legislation to help school districts increase teacher diversity. The Diverse Teacher Recruitment Act would establish a grants program for school districts to design and implement recruiting programs to bring teachers from underrepresented groups into the classroom.  The Department of Education would analyze the programs and disseminate data on which were effective in recruiting minority teachers.  Successful results could be replicated in other school districts.

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