Animal Welfare

Harley on the HillAs a member of the Animal Protection Caucus, Susan works to protect both wild and domestic animals from cruelty and abuse.  She supported efforts to close a loophole to ensure those who sell animals online are subject to same regulations as brick and mortar stores.  As a result, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) extended these regulations to online sales.

Susan has been recognized numerous times by the Humane Society of the United States’ with its Humane Advocate Award for her commitment to animal welfare.  She received a perfect score on HSUS’s scorecard for the first session of the 114th Congress.

 

Transparency within USDA

In response to constituent concerns and a series of articles published by Voice of San Diego on the activities of USDA’s Wildlife Services program, Susan introduced legislation to require the USDA to publish clear and accessible information about its activities in San Diego County and other counties throughout the country. The legislation is entitled the Transparency for Lethal Control Act (H.R. 2074).

The Wildlife Services program is responsible for intervening in situations when an animal is considered a threat or serious nuisance to humans.  In some cases, animals are killed to fulfill this mission.  There has been ongoing controversy when it comes to the transparency and accountability of Wildlife Services. 

She believes the killing of animals should not be a routine or reflexive government response.  It should only be undertaken, if at all, after careful deliberation and under strict supervision.  For that reason, the public and Congress need to have the opportunity for vigorous oversight to ensure that the USDA is acting appropriately and considering all cheaper and more humane alternatives. 

Protecting Elephants and Rhinos

Susan led a letter of her House colleagues urging passage of a California state bill to stop the ivory and rhino horn trades. Introduced by Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins, AB 96 would prohibit the sale, purchase or possession of ivory and rhino horns.  AB 96 was recently signed into law, effectively banning the ivory and rhino horn trade in California.

 

Protecting African Lions

In light of the tragic and senseless killing of Cecil the Lion, Susan urged the Department of Interior to finalize its ruling to list the African lion under the Endangered Species Act. This would outlaw the trade of African lions or lion parts by individuals subject to U.S. law. It would also make the African lion eligible for funding for conservation efforts.

 

Ending Cosmetic Testing on Animals

Thousands of animals are subjected to excruciating cosmetic testing each year. Mice, guinea pigs, rats, and rabbits all suffer needlessly and are eventually killed after the testing. Susan is supporting a bill in the House to ban testing cosmetics on animals and prohibit the sale of any cosmetic if the final product or any component was tested on animals.

Ending Horse Soring

Soring a horse is inflicting pain – through the use of chemicals or cutting - on the leg of a horse to force it into an exaggerated, unnatural gait.  Susan cosponsored the Prevent All Soring Tactics (or PAST) Act (H.R. 1518) to end the cruel practice of soring show horses.

Banning Body-Gripping Traps

Susan supports a House bill that would outlaw the use or possession of body-gripping traps in the National Wildlife Refuge System. Anyone caught using such traps to capture animals would face fines and/or prison time. 

More on Animal Welfare

Feb 17, 2017 Press Release

WASHINGTON – Congresswoman Susan Davis (D-San Diego) pressed President Trump to a restore access to vital information on animal welfare. Davis joined a bipartisan group of 100 members of the House in asking that the President direct the Department of Agriculture to reinstate a webpage that provides details on whether animals are being treated humanely under federal law.

Oct 25, 2016 Press Release

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Susan A. Davis (D-San Diego) once again rated a perfect score on the Human Society’s Legislative Scorecard of the 114th Congress. The scorecard tracks cosponsorship of bills and votes in the House that protects animals.

Jan 28, 2016 Press Release

WASHINGTON – Congresswoman Susan Davis (D-San Diego) received a score of 100% plus extra credit on the Humane Society’s Midterm Report for the 114th Congress. The scorecard tracks cosponsorship of bills and votes in the House that protects animals.

May 6, 2015 Press Release

WASHINGTON – A little-known office in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Wildlife Services, is responsible for intervening when an animal becomes a threat or serious nuisance to humans.  On many occasions, the animal is ultimately killed.  However, the reasons as to why or how is rarely made available to the public.

Congresswoman Susan Davis (D-San Diego) introduced legislation to require the USDA to publish clear and accessible information on such animal killings.

Mar 10, 2015 Press Release

WASHINGTON – Congresswoman Susan Davis (CA-53) led a letter of her House colleagues urging passage of a California state bill to stop the ivory and rhino horn trades. Introduced by Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins, AB 96 would prohibit the sale, purchase or possession of ivory and rhino horns.

May 21, 2013 Press Release

WASHINGTON – A little-known office in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Wildlife Services, is responsible for intervening when an animal becomes a threat or serious nuisance to humans.  On many occasions, the animal is ultimately killed.  However, there is a lack of transparency as to why or how.

Congresswoman Susan Davis (CA-53) reintroduced bipartisan legislation to require the USDA to publish clear and accessible information on such animal killings.

May 14, 2013 Editorial

Americans love animals. Over half of all American families own pets, and we overwhelmingly believe in protecting animals from cruelty and suffering. Yet too many of the businesses that provide Americans with their beloved companions perpetuate inhumane practices against dogs and cats, and I’m certain that even those who enjoy meat and animal products would be horrified by the conditions to which many livestock animals are subjected. When it comes to protecting animals under the law, we still have a ways to go.